ArchiKluge : Evolutionary Architectural Diagrams

September 30th, 2005 | Filed under: AI, Architecture, Design, Programming | No Comments »

ArchiKluge by Pablo Miranda Carranza (army of clerks), implements a Steady State Genetic Algorithm with Tournament Selection for an exploration into the “automatic design” of architectural diagrams. The program breeds, combines and mutates the genetic code of the 4x4x4 cell lattice in search for the most optimized form, in this case, a fitness function of “cells with other cells as far as possible from themselves (but still reachable). ”

via IlliGAL


Rapid Iris Biometrics

September 30th, 2005 | Filed under: Products, Social, Technology | No Comments »

The Sarnoff Corporation‘s new Iris on the Moveâ„¢ uses infrared LEDs and an algorithm that isolates one’s iris for biometric identification (2048-bit code) on moving subjects. The device, similar in shape to a metal detector, only requires subjects to look forward while walking to scan at speeds up to 20 IDs per minute.

via NS


AI Weather-talk

September 30th, 2005 | Filed under: AI, Future, Mapping, Technology | 1 Comment »

Weathermen don’t know what they’re talking about. Or, more precisely, have biased vocabulary when it comes to describing the weather. So, computer scientists at the University of Aberdeen, UK have created an AI WeatherAgent (part of the SumTime project) that interprets numerical data sets into a written summary to dish out unambiguous descriptions. [SumTime demo]

via NS


Self-Assembling Bio-robots

September 29th, 2005 | Filed under: AI, Mechanical Tech, Technology | 1 Comment »

Inspired by the replication process of DNA in living cells, Joseph Jacobson (Molecular Machines) and his team at MIT have created miniature robots that self-assemble and self-correct into a specified sequence from scattered parts. [msnbc article]

via wmmna | robotics


Kinematic Models for Design Library

September 29th, 2005 | Filed under: Mechanical Tech, Technology | No Comments »

The Kinematic Models for Design Digital Library is a collection of mechanical models and related resources for teaching the principles of kinematics–the geometry of pure motion. Browse through the enormouse collection of images + text, videos, 3D models (Solidworks, .stl or .VRML ready for printing), and interactive simulations. [launch the KMODDL tour]


Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interface

September 28th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Computing, Future, Virtual Reality | 1 Comment »

Brain-computer interfaces (BCI), like the one developed at the Graz University of Technology in Austria, places electrodes in key locations on the user’s scalp to detect nerve activity which is then translated to walking or movement of the virtual character’s hands. The team at the Graz University of Technology have incorporated a fully immersive Virtual Cave for a mind bending walk by thinking. [nature article]

via KurzweilAI

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Evolvica

September 27th, 2005 | Filed under: Design, Programming | No Comments »

Evolvica is an experimental open source Java framework for developing evolutionary algorithms based on the Eclipse platform. Users can create algorithms visually with user defined operators and sprint through generations of evolution to ultimate perfection.


3D LED Matrix

September 27th, 2005 | Filed under: Design, Lighting, Products, Programming | 4 Comments »

James Clar’s latest generation 3D Display Cube is a hand-made LED display matrix of 1000 white LEDs. The matrix incorporates software developed by Josh Nimoy to display Photoshop and Aftereffects files as well as 3D animations and a 3D Pong game. [video] [shop]

via MoCo Loco


Self-Assembling Viral Battery

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Biotech, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Nanotech, Science | 3 Comments »

Dr. Angela Belcher and her group at MIT are developing an organic-inorganic hybrid method of growing batteries. By forcing viruses to interact with materials like metals, Dr. Belcher is exploring new materials that are self assembling with a high degree of control based on the chosen DNA sequence. Imagine selecting DNA for any type of material you want the virus to grow. [Discover Article]

via Medgadget | ScienCentral


'Smart Concrete' for Levees

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Building Tech, Materials, Products | 13 Comments »

Deborah D. L. Chung‘s mixture of carbon fibers and conventional concrete, is an electrically conductive “smart concrete” (developed at the Composite Materials Research Laboratory) that can be continuously monitored for changes in electrical resistance as the material goes under stress. Levees and other critical structures can benefit from “smart concrete” and other early warning systems that sense subtle changes which occur prior to its failure.

via Physorg