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Future Feeder » Fabrication Tech

3D printed houses are “not that far off”

February 16th, 2013 | Filed under: Architecture, Fabrication Tech | Tags: | No Comments »
via Dezeen

first successfully printed ceramic vessel

February 21st, 2010 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech | 1 Comment »

Potje 09 Klein

Unfold Fab: The future’s here baby! first successfully printed ceramic vessel.


Shapways : 3D Printing in Stainless Steel

August 10th, 2009 | Filed under: Building Tech, Fabrication Tech, Materials | 1 Comment »

shapewaysphoto3177

Shapeways has now added stainless steel to their list of available materials to 3D print from. The bracelet above in polished stainless steel costs $40. [Shapeways]


BAKOKO at Pecha Kucha Tokyo

August 7th, 2009 | Filed under: Architecture, Design, Fabrication Tech, Materials, Video | No Comments »

BAKOKO Pecha Kucha Vol. 64 – SuperDeluxe, Tokyo from BAKOKO on Vimeo.

BAKOKO uses Generative Components. Does still crash every 5 minutes?


Moving Structure

January 9th, 2007 | Filed under: Architecture, Fabrication Tech, Materials | No Comments »

impression.jpg

Moving Structure by Pavel Hladik is the design of the moving structure takes advantage of the Teflon foils and Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) NiTiCu. This structure is fixed to the ground or to another structure and is a part of the electrical circuit. The reactions controlled by computer are caused by the various circuits which connect the members of spirals of SMAs. The members are covered by the layered Teflon foil which is welded to the shape which is determined by the critical shape of the whole structure.

via Interactive Architecture dot Org


Tesla Motors

July 20th, 2006 | Filed under: Design, Fabrication Tech, Sustainability, Technology | 24 Comments »

tesla-roadster.jpg

Tesla Motors has just unveiled the Tesla Roadster, a 0-to-60 in 4 about seconds, electric car.  No, it's not a dead end wish-it-would-be-real prototype.  The car is set to ship to your door late spring/early summer of 2007.


Mobile Living

April 4th, 2006 | Filed under: Architecture, Building Tech, Fabrication Tech, Products, Sustainability, Urbanism | 2 Comments »

Mobile-Living.jpg

Presented in the spectacular 18,000 sf Skylight Studios Gallery, Soho, NYC, Mobile Living will exhibit the unparalleled advancements in our society that have manifested our modern nomadic lifestyle. . . Mixing design and technology this will be a groundbreaking, curated presentation, running concurrently with the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), and DesignDowntown in New York City, May 2006. Mobile Homes, Mobile Phones, Mobile computing, Automobiles, Motor homes, indoor and outdoor furniture will all be topics in the show.


Airbus A380 assembled in 7 Mins

March 16th, 2006 | Filed under: Building Tech, Fabrication Tech, Video | 4 Comments »

Length: 73 m (239 ft 6 in)
Wingspan: 79.8 m (261 ft 10 in)
Height: 24.1 m (79 ft 1 in)
Wing area: 845 m² (9,100 ft²)
more at A380 Wiki [video (google)]

via Screenhead


Selective Laser Melting : 3D Printing in Metal

March 8th, 2006 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Mechanical Tech, Products | 1 Comment »

MCP Group’s MCP Realizer takes 3D printing / rapid prototyping into the world of metals. MCP uses a technique called SLM (Selective Laser Melting) which uses ordinary metal powders (bronze, zinc, stainless steel, tool steel, titanium, cobalt-chrome alloys) and a laser to melt thin layers of geometry repeatedly to produce finished parts. more>

Treehugger


Personal / Desktop Fabrication

December 6th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Future, Products, Technology | 2 Comments »

Imagine that your coffee maker breaks just before you’re about to host a brunch. You go online and click on the model you want to buy. But you don’t have to wait for it to be shipped; instead, a machine on your desk kicks into operation. Inside a glass chamber, a nozzle spits out the electronics, chassis, motor and other components, layer by layer. An hour later, you snap together a few parts and the brewing begins. David Pescovitz has written a great article for Salon on the future of desktop fabrication and the various approaches researchers are pursuing.