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Future Feeder » Fabrication Tech
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Industrial Origami

November 20th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Materials, Products | 1 Comment »

Industrial Origami uses its patented “smiles” stamp or cut to create foldable sheet metal products up to 2 inches thick. Benchmark tests have shown remarkable strength and unusual resistance to fatigue.

Thanks, John.


Broad-Spectrum White LEDs

October 25th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Future, Lighting, Nanotech, Products, Sustainability | No Comments »

Anyone who has bought “white” LED devices knows that the light is not quite white. Michael Bowers, a graduate student at Vanderbilt University, has discovered an alternative method of producing white LEDs with a broad spectrum while remaining cool to the touch. This discovery will certainly make its way to architectural lighting and large scale applications as LED production costs drop. Bowers’ method also indicates possibilities to provide illumination through chemical processes in a luminescent paint to transform any surface into an light source.

via Exploration | Treehugger | Worldchanging


Buckypaper : New Applications

October 23rd, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Materials, Nanotech, Technology | 2 Comments »

The Florida Advanced Center for Composite Technologies (FAC2T) under the direction of Ben Wang, is working to develop real-world applications for Buckypaper, a material made of carbon nanotubes. The film holds potential for use in illuminating devices, heat sinks, armor, and electromagnetic protective skins. [press release]

via Physorg


Bell Labs Unveils Printed Computer Chip

October 12th, 2005 | Filed under: Computing, Fabrication Tech, Materials, Technology | No Comments »

Researchers at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs and Germany-based BASF Future Systems and Printed Systems unveiled the worlds first working circuit made using regular printing methods. Their method, unlike others experimenting with organic circuitry printing, doesn’t involve any lithographic steps. The conductive ink is simply printed and evaporates, leaving a crystalline semiconducting material.

via Sci-Tech Today


Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines

October 12th, 2005 | Filed under: Books, Fabrication Tech, Future | No Comments »

Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines, by Robert A. Freitas Jr. and Ralph C. Merkle, is a comprehensive review of theoretical and experimental kinematic replicator projects of all scales as of 2004 (available for free online).

via KurzweilAI


Self-Assembling Viral Battery

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Biotech, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Nanotech, Science | 3 Comments »

Dr. Angela Belcher and her group at MIT are developing an organic-inorganic hybrid method of growing batteries. By forcing viruses to interact with materials like metals, Dr. Belcher is exploring new materials that are self assembling with a high degree of control based on the chosen DNA sequence. Imagine selecting DNA for any type of material you want the virus to grow. [Discover Article]

via Medgadget | ScienCentral


Tactile Photography

September 16th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Photography | No Comments »

The always interesting James Patten in collaboration with Mariliana Arvelo have created this series of tactile photographic prints as part of a project about the deafblind community in Boston, called “Senses”. The works are produced through a CNC laser etching process that removes the top portion of the wood. The darker the image is a any particular point, the more wood is removed by the laser at that point. The result is a photographic relief that can be touched as well as seen. [gallery]


Spray-on Skin Cells

September 7th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Biotech, Fabrication Tech, Future, Health | 6 Comments »

The first controlled clinical study to examine the effectiveness of sprayed cultured skin cells to close the wounds of burns victims is being undertaken at the Queen Victoria Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (QVH), East Grinstead. “We have seen what I can only describe as miraculous results using spray on skin with patients surviving 90% burns who otherwise had very little chance of survival.” [press release]

via MedGadget | BBC


Carbon Nanotube Ribbon Printer

September 4th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Nanotech, Science | 4 Comments »

Researcher from the University of Texas, Dallas, and Australia’s CSIRO have a new dry-state method of self-assembling carbon nanotube ribbons at a whopping 7 meters per minute! (I’m sure in just a few years the exclamation point will look ridiculous.) [video]

via WorldChanging | EurekAlert


Nano-material Harder than Diamonds

September 1st, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Design, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials | No Comments »

A new material known as aggregated carbon nanorods (ACNR) has been created by packing buckyballs under 200 times the normal atmospheric pressure and heating it to 2226°C. ACNR is 0.3% denser than ordinary diamond and more resistant to pressure than any other known material.

via nanotechweb | NS