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Future Feeder » Materials

Bell Labs Unveils Printed Computer Chip

October 12th, 2005 | Filed under: Computing, Fabrication Tech, Materials, Technology | No Comments »

Researchers at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs and Germany-based BASF Future Systems and Printed Systems unveiled the worlds first working circuit made using regular printing methods. Their method, unlike others experimenting with organic circuitry printing, doesn’t involve any lithographic steps. The conductive ink is simply printed and evaporates, leaving a crystalline semiconducting material.

via Sci-Tech Today


Supersolids : Solids passing through solids

October 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Materials, Science, Technology | 1 Comment »

What!? Moses Chan and his colleagues at Pennsylvania State University have created the world’s first “supersolids“, bizarre crystals that slide through each other like ghosts. [article 2005] [article 2004]

via NS


Self-Assembling Viral Battery

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Biotech, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Nanotech, Science | 3 Comments »

Dr. Angela Belcher and her group at MIT are developing an organic-inorganic hybrid method of growing batteries. By forcing viruses to interact with materials like metals, Dr. Belcher is exploring new materials that are self assembling with a high degree of control based on the chosen DNA sequence. Imagine selecting DNA for any type of material you want the virus to grow. [Discover Article]

via Medgadget | ScienCentral


'Smart Concrete' for Levees

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Building Tech, Materials, Products | 13 Comments »

Deborah D. L. Chung‘s mixture of carbon fibers and conventional concrete, is an electrically conductive “smart concrete” (developed at the Composite Materials Research Laboratory) that can be continuously monitored for changes in electrical resistance as the material goes under stress. Levees and other critical structures can benefit from “smart concrete” and other early warning systems that sense subtle changes which occur prior to its failure.

via Physorg


Nano-material Harder than Diamonds

September 1st, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Design, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials | No Comments »

A new material known as aggregated carbon nanorods (ACNR) has been created by packing buckyballs under 200 times the normal atmospheric pressure and heating it to 2226°C. ACNR is 0.3% denser than ordinary diamond and more resistant to pressure than any other known material.

via nanotechweb | NS


Anti-Fog Nanocoating

August 30th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Materials, Nanotech, Products, Technology | 1 Comment »

With the help of nanotachonlogy, foggy windows, foggy goggles, and foggy glasses are about to meet the ultimate anti-fog treatment developed by a group of scientists at MIT. Soon, you’ll be telling your kids how, back in the day, you used to entertain yourself by writing profanities in foggy windows.

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One-atom-thick materials and the 'new industrial revolution'

August 3rd, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Science, Technology | No Comments »

Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a new class of materials which have previously only existed in science fiction films and books. A team of British and Russian scientists led by Professor Geim have discovered a whole family of previously unknown materials, which are one atom thick and exhibit properties which scientists had never thought possible. Published on 18 July, 2005 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [abstract]

via physorg


Pyron Solar Electric Generator

July 24th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Materials, Products, Sustainability, Technology, Urbanism | 3 Comments »

Pyron Solar Inc.‘s (San Diego, CA) new Pyron Solar Electric Generator, runs at less than $3 per Watt with 1/4 to 1/20 the size of other systems. Pyron’s system works by concentrating direct sunlight 400X into its photovoltaic cells. Projections by Pyron estimate possible costs for large power plants at $1.24 per Watt and enough efficiency to power the entire US with a 50 square mile plot of land in the desert southwest.

A similar idea, at a larger scale, is being researched by Materialab (at RPI) as a curtain wall system with embedded Fresnel lenses that track and concentrate sunlight into PV cells. [article]

via PowerPulse


Glass Sponge Skeleton Structure

July 13th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Design, Materials, Science | 4 Comments »

John D. Currey, a biologist at the University of York, in England, analyzed Euplectella (Class Hexactinellida), commonly known as glass sponge, and has found “a skeleton of extraordinary structural and mechanical refinement.” It is built in structural levels. Silica particles become filaments, which are formed into spicules, then gathered into larger spicules, which are arranged in a grid with struts and formed into a cylinder, with stiffening surface ridges.

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Deep Impact

June 27th, 2005 | Filed under: Mapping, Materials, News, Science, Technology | No Comments »

In less than a week NASA’s Deep Impact mission will collide with comet Tempel 1 with a 1 meter wide impactor at 23,000 mph after a voyage of 173 days and 431 million kilometers (268 million miles). [Impact test video] (made of dust, ice, window cleaner and Worchestershire sauce over garden perlite) [interactive feature]

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