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Future Feeder » Science
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Octacube : Hyper Sculpture

October 20th, 2005 | Filed under: Mathematics, Science | No Comments »

Adrian Ocneanu, professor of mathematics at Penn State, has designed a stainless steel sculpture depicting a 3-dimensional projection of a 4-dimensional “octacube”. The massive sculpture was fabricated by Penn State’s Engineering Services Shop. [press release] [animation]

via Physorg


Supersolids : Solids passing through solids

October 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Materials, Science, Technology | 1 Comment »

What!? Moses Chan and his colleagues at Pennsylvania State University have created the world’s first “supersolids“, bizarre crystals that slide through each other like ghosts. [article 2005] [article 2004]

via NS


Arthur Ganson's Machines : Kinetic Sculpture

October 2nd, 2005 | Filed under: Design, Mechanical Tech, Science, Video | 2 Comments »

Arthur Ganson’s kinetic sculptures are extraordinarily intricate playful mechanisms, choreographed to move in a delightfully life-like manner while remaining incredibly precise. [video] [move videos]


Self-Assembling Viral Battery

September 26th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Biotech, Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Nanotech, Science | 3 Comments »

Dr. Angela Belcher and her group at MIT are developing an organic-inorganic hybrid method of growing batteries. By forcing viruses to interact with materials like metals, Dr. Belcher is exploring new materials that are self assembling with a high degree of control based on the chosen DNA sequence. Imagine selecting DNA for any type of material you want the virus to grow. [Discover Article]

via Medgadget | ScienCentral


Nano Computing

September 7th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Computing, Future, Nanotech, Science, Technology | 18 Comments »

“Computing isn’t just confined to semiconductors. Molecules have been processing information ever since life has been around on our planet. Harnessing this remarkable ability really does have the potential to make a big difference to people’s lives.” For the first time, chemists at Queen’s University Belfast, with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) have managed to manipulate molecules to perform logic operations based on the principles of photosynthesis.

via Physorg | BBC

more »


Carbon Nanotube Ribbon Printer

September 4th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Nanotech, Science | 4 Comments »

Researcher from the University of Texas, Dallas, and Australia’s CSIRO have a new dry-state method of self-assembling carbon nanotube ribbons at a whopping 7 meters per minute! (I’m sure in just a few years the exclamation point will look ridiculous.) [video]

via WorldChanging | EurekAlert


Remote-Controlled Humans

August 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Augmented, Future, Health, Products, Science | No Comments »

NTT Communication Science Lab is showcasing a human-controlling device at SIGGRAPH 2005, appropriately titled Shaking the World: Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation as a Novel Sensation Interface. Simply put, this is “a device that controls a person’s movement by remote control.” [article] [video]

National Geographic article on remote controlled rats (2002)

via slashdot


Vital Signs : nARCHITECTS

August 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Internet, Mapping, Science | No Comments »

Vital Signs, by nARCHITECTS, is a mobius strip (LED) display streaming breaking news at the Liberty Science Center.

via wmmna


One-atom-thick materials and the 'new industrial revolution'

August 3rd, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Future, Materials, Science, Technology | No Comments »

Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a new class of materials which have previously only existed in science fiction films and books. A team of British and Russian scientists led by Professor Geim have discovered a whole family of previously unknown materials, which are one atom thick and exhibit properties which scientists had never thought possible. Published on 18 July, 2005 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [abstract]

via physorg


Cities, Satellites and Weather

August 3rd, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Health, Mapping, Science, Urbanism | No Comments »



Just how does society’s desire to live in densely populated areas have the potential to change our Earth’s climate? According to a new paper, satellites can help us answer that question.

more »