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Future Feeder » Sustainability

Room temperature tabletop fusion confirmed

February 13th, 2006 | Filed under: Science, Sustainability, Technology | No Comments »

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a tabletop accelerator that produces nuclear fusion at room temperature, providing confirmation of an earlier experiment conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), while offering substantial improvements over the original design. [press release]

via Science Blog


The Quiet Revolution

January 30th, 2006 | Filed under: Architecture, Design, Products, Sustainability | 1 Comment »



The Quiet Revolution
, a vibration-free silent wind turbine developed by XCO2, slated for its first installation this March (2006), could produce 10,000 kWh per year at an average wind speed of 5.8 m/s.

via Treehugger


The Push Button House

December 2nd, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Design, Sustainability, Urbanism | 3 Comments »

Adam Kalkin‘s Push Button House is a shipping container fully pimped out to reveal its lavish insides with the push of a button. “It works like a flower – you push a button and the thing transforms itself.”

NYT


Broad-Spectrum White LEDs

October 25th, 2005 | Filed under: Fabrication Tech, Future, Lighting, Nanotech, Products, Sustainability | No Comments »

Anyone who has bought “white” LED devices knows that the light is not quite white. Michael Bowers, a graduate student at Vanderbilt University, has discovered an alternative method of producing white LEDs with a broad spectrum while remaining cool to the touch. This discovery will certainly make its way to architectural lighting and large scale applications as LED production costs drop. Bowers’ method also indicates possibilities to provide illumination through chemical processes in a luminescent paint to transform any surface into an light source.

via Exploration | Treehugger | Worldchanging


10,000 Year Clock : The Long Now

October 19th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Mechanical Tech, Social, Sustainability, Technology | 3 Comments »

W. Daniel Hillis of Applied Minds, Inc. is designing a perfectly synchronized 10,000 year clock / sculpture / statement with the Long Now Foundation. Everything about this clock is deeply unusual. For example, while nearly every mechanical clock made in the last millennium consists of a series of propelled gears, this one uses a stack of mechanical binary computers capable of singling out one moment in 3.65 million days. . . Unlike any other clock, this one is being constructed to keep track of leap centuries, the orbits of the six innermost planets in our solar system, even the ultraslow wobbles of Earth’s axis. . .”The ultimate design criterion is that people have to care about it,” says Hillis. “If they don’t, it won’t last.”

via Discover

more »


New Songdo City : U-City

October 6th, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Design, Future, Social, Sustainability, Urbanism | 6 Comments »

New Songdo City, a man-made island being privately developed from the ground up by Gale International and POSCO E&C, is gaining much attention due to its contemporary nature and its willingness to experiment with ubiquitous technology from phase 1 to its completion of phase 5 in 2014. Dubbed ‘the Hong Kong of the 21st century’ or ‘Ubiquitous City’, the South Korean government’s scheme to attract multinational corporations with technology and a ‘Free Economic Zone’ will surely be something to watch.

via WorldChanging | wmmna | NYT

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Power-Generating Backpack

September 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Design, Mechanical Tech, Sustainability | 1 Comment »

Lawrence Rome‘s ingenious suspended-load backpack harnesses the users’s 2-3 inch (5-7 cm) vertical movement while walking to produce up to 7.4 watts of power. An added bonus comes from the suspended mechanism of the cargo, cushioning the impact of heavy loads on the body. The solution boasts an incredible efficiencey in performance, all packaged in the added weight equivalent to a candy bar. [press release]

via Treehugger | wmmna


Urban Nomad Shelter

September 1st, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Design, Mapping, Products, Social, Sustainability, Urbanism | 7 Comments »

Urban Nomad Shelter, designed by Cameron McNall and Damon Seeley of Electroland, acts as both a “humanitarian act and as a social provocation.” The neon colored inflatable shelters stand as beacons or plot points as they are scattered across a landscape, commodifying and exhibiting those whom are often neglected. [I.D. Magazine 51’s Annual Design Review (Winner, Concept category)]

See also Michael Rakowitz’s paraSITE.

via wmmna


Sustainable House of the Future Runs on Spinach

August 24th, 2005 | Filed under: Architecture, Building Tech, Future, Sustainability, Technology, Urbanism | 21 Comments »

The winning entry to the Cradle to Cradle C2C Home Competition is an incredible single family dwelling by Matthew Coates and Tim Meldrum that goes right to the core fundamentals of the Cradle to Cradle principles. Not only does the building run a photosynthetic and phototropic skin made with spinach protein, but it also produces more energy than a single family’s needs, allowing the excess to be distributed to neighbors. This radical shift, from centralized energy systems today, fosters community interdependence as neighbors benefit from the resources of others.


Pleistocene Rewilding : Wild Animals May Roam Again

August 20th, 2005 | Filed under: Biology, Past, Sustainability | 1 Comment »

If Cornell University researchers and their colleagues have their way, cheetahs, lions, elephants, camels and other large wild animals may soon roam parts of North America. The plan calls for the establishment of large ecological history parks in the Great Plains and the Southwest to have elephants, cheetahs, lions, and other large mammals imported from Africa roaming freely. [article]

via Biology News Net