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Future Feeder » Technology
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Supersolids : Solids passing through solids

October 9th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Materials, Science, Technology | 1 Comment »

What!? Moses Chan and his colleagues at Pennsylvania State University have created the world’s first “supersolids“, bizarre crystals that slide through each other like ghosts. [article 2005] [article 2004]

via NS


Lightspace DepthCube: 3D Volumetric Display

October 1st, 2005 | Filed under: Products, Technology, Virtual Reality | 4 Comments »

LightSpace claims its DepthCube is the world’s first solid-state volumetric 3D display capable of 3-dimensional projections without any headgear or moving parts. The display runs on a stack of 20 liquid crystal shutters synchronized with a video projector (50Hz refresh rate) all packed in a TV set box circa 1980.


Rapid Iris Biometrics

September 30th, 2005 | Filed under: Products, Social, Technology | No Comments »

The Sarnoff Corporation‘s new Iris on the Moveâ„¢ uses infrared LEDs and an algorithm that isolates one’s iris for biometric identification (2048-bit code) on moving subjects. The device, similar in shape to a metal detector, only requires subjects to look forward while walking to scan at speeds up to 20 IDs per minute.

via NS


AI Weather-talk

September 30th, 2005 | Filed under: AI, Future, Mapping, Technology | 1 Comment »

Weathermen don’t know what they’re talking about. Or, more precisely, have biased vocabulary when it comes to describing the weather. So, computer scientists at the University of Aberdeen, UK have created an AI WeatherAgent (part of the SumTime project) that interprets numerical data sets into a written summary to dish out unambiguous descriptions. [SumTime demo]

via NS


Self-Assembling Bio-robots

September 29th, 2005 | Filed under: AI, Mechanical Tech, Technology | 1 Comment »

Inspired by the replication process of DNA in living cells, Joseph Jacobson (Molecular Machines) and his team at MIT have created miniature robots that self-assemble and self-correct into a specified sequence from scattered parts. [msnbc article]

via wmmna | robotics


Kinematic Models for Design Library

September 29th, 2005 | Filed under: Mechanical Tech, Technology | No Comments »

The Kinematic Models for Design Digital Library is a collection of mechanical models and related resources for teaching the principles of kinematics–the geometry of pure motion. Browse through the enormouse collection of images + text, videos, 3D models (Solidworks, .stl or .VRML ready for printing), and interactive simulations. [launch the KMODDL tour]


Acoustic Keystroke Recording

September 17th, 2005 | Filed under: Internet, Technology | 2 Comments »

The researchers were able to take several 10-minute sound recordings of users typing at a keyboard, feed the audio into a computer, and use an algorithm to recover up to 96 percent of the characters entered. The algorithm distinguishes the acoustical nuances in each of the keyboard’s buttons and uses statistical algorithms to weed out unlikely letter combinations. [article]

via wmmna


Real-Time Mobile Landscape

September 16th, 2005 | Filed under: Mapping, Social, Technology, Urbanism | No Comments »

Digital Derive, by senseable city lab, taps into the social network of the ubiquitous cell phone in Graz, Austria. The density of cellphone calls, origins and destinations of the calls, and position of users are tracked anonymously in real time, visualizing the organism that social networks of communications are any moment.

Thanks, EZCT.

more »


Launch Your Own Satellite into Space

September 14th, 2005 | Filed under: Future, Technology | 2 Comments »

The CubeSat program, developed at Stanford University and California Polytechnic State University, aims to give universities and high schools a chance to launch their own satellite into low Earth orbit (240-360 miles above). There will be 9 Cubesats in orbit by Sept.27th 2005 with numerous institutes all around the world working on their own Cubesats. For $40,000 to build and $40,000 to launch, you too could have your own satellite network. [article]

via KurzweilAI


Self -Healing CPUs

September 10th, 2005 | Filed under: Computing, Future, Technology | No Comments »

NASA’s Ames Research Center has a team working on two processor systems that are proprietary variations of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), which use an evolutionary algorithm to reconstruct damaged layouts to its proper configuration. Andy Tyrell at the UK’s University of York is working on immunotronics, a digital immune system that can detect corrupt strings of data that need attention to be fixed on the fly.

via Wired